Sunday, March 27, 2016

Why rich people are miserable

Mike Cernovich explains why, and more importantly, how to avoid following their example:
Living life on your terms is an offensive game.

Living life on your terms means setting the agenda. Only work with people you want to work with. Only talk to people you want to talk with.

You no longer need to explain yourself to people. If someone bores you, move on. If someone annoys you, why waste your time?
Remember that life is about focus and energy.

Where are you focusing your vision and how are you applying your energy?

Are you focusing your vision on negative people and then using your energy to fight off bad vibes and toxic emotions?

How much more energy would you have if you weren’t always recovering from negative experiences?
While he doesn't spell it out precisely, one major reason why rich people are miserable is that everyone wants to be around them because everyone wants something from them. That's why so many of them become reclusive and suspicious; they haven't got the ability to ruthlessly cull the positive people who contribute to their lives from the negative people who ruin it.

If you want to prove you are worthwhile to someone, then do something for them. Don't do it as a quid pro quo, do it as a demonstration of merit. Maybe good things will come of it. Maybe not. Regardless, you will be the better off for it.

Don't be a parasite. Don't be constantly asking others to do things for you, and give things to you. Figure out how you can help others, how you can be of use to others, and it won't be too terribly long long before people will be wanting to do the same for you.

19 comments:

Ron said...

Last night I was working for around 8 hours straight trying to finish a deadline. I usually feel pretty good after that kind of thing, and I was surprised by how bitter and depressed I was. Then I read that line by Cernovich this morning where he wrote:


Are you focusing your vision on negative people and then using your energy to fight off bad vibes and toxic emotions?

How much more energy would you have if you weren’t always recovering from negative experiences?


After I read that, it occurred to me that while I was working I had been listening to downloaded programs of a TV show I used to like in the background. This show has been getting progressively more progressive and anti-male with every season, and I realized that I had been listening to it while it was near it's worst. No wonder I was half crazy by the time I finished working.

So my question for everyone is this: are there any positive tv shows, past or present, with a healthy male message that you guys recommend watching?

Jon M said...

Great question. Particularly for those of us with kids.

Stg58/Animal Mother said...

I like the show Dexter. Not sure if the message is healthy and pro-male, but it doesn't make me feel like shit afterwards.

Stg58/Animal Mother said...

Why not watch Dukes of Hazzard? One of the best shows ever.

Laguna Beach Fogey said...

Sensible advice. But we should be ready to admit that plenty of rich people are perfectly happy, and money can produce happiness.

Cataline Sergius said...

If you want to prove you are worthwhile to someone, then do something for them. Don't do it as a quid pro quo, do it as a demonstration of merit. Maybe good things will come of it. Maybe not. Regardless, you will be the better off for it.

It's also the best method of stress relief there is.

When you really feel like you are being crushed, the world is at your throat and there is no escape...help someone else. It will lift the pressure of stress like nothing else possibly can. It puts things into perspective and forces you to take a look at the biggest picture out there.

Caveat: Do not let the person you help parasitize you in the process. That won't help either of you. So watch for that.

Cataline Sergius said...

Money comes with it's own problems.

A guy know moans about how everyone he meets is always trying to get him to go into business with them. Invariably that business is a bar.

If you are pro-athlete, then that business will be a car wash.

Pro-athletes have this problem worse than anyone else. Anyone who ever gave them a cigarette back when they lived in the hood, now feels that the pro in question is obliged to pay their mortgage. They have tons of money, a career with a three year lifespan and no idea how not to go broke.

Ron said...

@Stg8

D of H is a really good idea. I als thought of playing podcasts like Cernovichs'

Midknight said...

What show to avoid Ron?

I haven't checked out last man standing yet but heard good things about it.

Tom K. said...

Both rich and poor want to be happy and aren't. Unless they have learned to be. Poor people used to be happier because they didn't have mass media showing them everything g everyone else but they had. Godliness with contentment is also happiness.

"I've been rich and I've been poor. Rich is better."

"I'd rather be rich and healthy than poor and sick."

A good is a good but you can twidt it into a bad.

Rex Little said...

Figure out how you can help others, how you can be of use to others, and it won't be too terribly long long before people will be wanting to do the same for you.

Makes a lot of sense on the one hand. But when you apply it to intersexual relationships, it sounds like white-knighting.

praetorian said...

Additionally, a lot of rich people suffer from the same problem that posters suffer from over at VD, or smart folks do at top universities: they are at the end of the bell curve, so there is a larger range of wealth they encounter. Yes, some people are rich, but a few people are *rich rich* (or *smart smart*) and since humans usually judge themselves relative to other humans they know, rich people can feel like losers/idiots.

Couple that with the sociopathy that pools wherever there is wealth, and the "never satisfied" attitude that it often takes to get rich...

"Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven."

sigsawyer said...

Dealing with parasitical people strikes me as something alphas and betas have to worry about. Mike's advice to just 'move on' is my default state; if I don't make really strong ties with someone (I'm talking fewer than ten people) my life tends to leave them behind. On the other hand, the only way for a sigma to ingratiate himself into established groups is to provide value to them.

I really couldn't imagine being an alpha, sitting on a metaphorical throne with all my supplicants plotting behind my back. It calls to mind the idea that the king is the least free person in the country.

Betas are those who give of themselves. If their giving is rewarded, (i.e. through social status, access to women, money, etc.) they're greater betas. The building blocks of the West. If their giving goes unreciprocated, they're lesser betas. Whipping boys. They might run in better circles than deltas but their relative status is lower.

Deltas are defined more by their relations to each other than people of other status. Rather than give, they share or make transactions. If the relationship between Alphas and Betas is the relationship between an Anglo-Saxon king (gold-friend) and his retainers, the relationship between Alphas and Deltas is that of a boss and his hired workers.

Rabbi B said...

Yes. Even the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve. Not a bad example there. The greatest among you will be the servant of all.

Anchorman said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anchorman said...

I haven't checked out last man standing yet but heard good things about it.

I gave it a shot this weekend.

Lots of "one foot in - one foot out" where the dad seems assertive, but is treated like a bumbler. Daughter is a single mom, father is a "deadbeat, never around." Other daughter's an aspiring tramp/diva. Last daughter is a daddy's girl (superstar in athletics, not prissy).

Really, it's Tool Time in an outdoor store.

Maybe it gets better, but I gave it several episodes. I gave up after about six episodes.

Hot daughters, though.

tz said...

Living life on your terms means setting the agenda. Only work with people you want to work with. Only talk to people you want to talk with.
I have known a few. They lived in cardboard boxes beneath overpasses. There are very few people I actually want to talk with. If I used that standard I would be among the cardboard class. Those with six-figure debt having earned a degree in "gender studies" are doing exactly this as well, except most smile and must talk as they need to know what drink you want at Starbucks. You can set any agenda. You cannot force people to patronize it in a free market, and the socialist alternative is even more corrosive on your soul. Bad cops enforcing ticket quotas and IRS auditors might enjoy talking, but their victims don't
If you want to prove you are worthwhile to someone, then do something for them.
I don't understand why anyone would wish to prove they are worthwhile to someONE. I can see proving the general case - I provide a generic useful service - but not something like a utilitarian sycophancy, at least until a monarchy returns. Nor do I think finding how I can be used by others by allowing such will end well.

Eric said...

You no longer need to explain yourself to people. If someone bores you, move on. If someone annoys you, why waste your time?

It seems like a short step from there to letting your fingernails grow out and surrounding yourself with Mormons. People are going to disappoint on occasion. If you're too aggressive in your culling you're going to find yourself bitter and lonely.

CarpeOro said...

"Don't be a parasite. Don't be constantly asking others to do things for you, and give things to you."

In other words, don't act like most women.

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